Blood Pressure

The force of blood as it presses against the walls your arteries is recorded as two numbers. The top number (systolic) measures the force while your heart pumps. The bottom number (diastolic) measures the force between heart pumps. Normal blood pressure is less than 120 (systolic) and less than 80 (diastolic). Blood pressure that is 120-139 systolic and 80-89 diastolic is considered pre-hypertension. High blood pressure begins when blood pressure is 140+ systolic and 90+ diastolic.

Blood Pressure

Systolic

Diastolic

Normal

Less than 120

Less than 80

Prehypertension

120-139

80-89

High Blood Pressure Stage 1

140-159

90-99

High Blood Pressure Stage 2

160+

100+

Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers

Normal fasting blood glucose is below 100 mg/dL. A person with pre-diabetes has a fasting blood glucose level between 100 and 125 mg/dL. If the blood glucose level rises to 126 mg/dL or above, a person has diabetes.

Normal fasting blood glucose

Below 100 mg/dL

Pre-Diabetes

100-125 mg/dL

Diabetes

126 mg/dL or above

Cholesterol / LDL level / HDL level

Cholesterol can be both good and bad. If an individual has less than 200 in total cholesterol than its heart healthy target is desirable. If an individuals' cholesterol is from 200 to 239 than they are borderline high risk. If an individual's total cholesterol is 240 and above than they have high blood cholesterol.

Total Cholesterol

Less than 200

Desirable total cholesterol

200-239

Borderline high risk

240 and above

High blood cholesterol

Below are charts for reading LDL and HDL levels.

LDL Level

<100

Optimal

100-129

Near optimal

 130-159

Borderline high

160-189

High

>190

Very High

HDL Level

Less than 40

High Risk

40-59

Lower Risk

60 and above

Optimal (protective)

Body Mass Index (BMI)

You should have your weight checked regularly. Body Mass Index (BMI) is a reliable indicator of total body fat, which is related to the risk of disease and death. A normal BMI score is 19-24. For people considered obese or overweight, even a small weight loss (just 10% of your current weight) will help lower your risk of developing diseases associated with obesity.

Less than 19

Underweight

19-24

Healthy/Normal Weight

25-29

Overweight

30+

Obese

Waist Circumference and Waist-to-hip ratio (WHR)

Waist circumference is a common measure used to assess abdominal fat content. The presence of excess body fat in the abdomen, when out of proportion to total body fat, is considered an independent predictor of risk factors and ailments associated with obesity. Men are at risk is their waist measurement is greater than 40 inches and women greater than 35 inches.

Waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) is the ratio of a person's waist circumference to hip circumference. For men, a ratio of .90 or less is considered safe and for women, a ratio of .80 or less is considered safe. For both men and women, a WHR of 1.0 or higher is considered "at risk" for potential consequences such as heart disease and other ailments connected with being overweight.

 

Men

Women

Waist Circumference

At risk if greater than 40 inches

At risk if greater than 35 inches

Waist-to-hip Ratio (WHR)

.90 or less is considered safe

.80 or less is considered safe

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